Eck Institute for Global Health announces new graduate student fellows

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Eigh Grad Student Fellows

Seven University of Notre Dame graduate students have successfully received fellowships from the Eck Institute for Global Health (EIGH). The EIGH Graduate Student Fellowship Program was established to support students enrolled in the Notre Dame doctorate program who have an interest in global health research.

“This fellowship program provides an opportunity for Notre Dame graduate students to work with our faculty and become more directly engaged in the fight for global health,” said Bernard Nahlen, director of the EIGH and professor of biological sciences. “I look forward to seeing how these young researchers develop their own skills and interests to contribute to better health for everyone, everywhere.”

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Hackathons may accelerate scientific discovery, study finds

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Hackathonphoto

From interdisciplinary teams to multi-institutional partnerships, collaborations in research have become commonplace. However, these interactions are often made up of siloed teams who pass information along a pipeline rather than operating cohesively. In a new study, researchers have shown how hackathons, or other crowdsourcing events, may provide a good strategy for building bridges over the traditional divides of research partnerships and accelerate scientific discovery.

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Daniel Erickson Named 2018 Berry Family Foundation Graduate Fellow

Author: Brandi Klingerman

2018 Berry FellowDaniel Erickson, 2018 Berry Family Foundation Graduate Fellow

Daniel Erickson, graduate student of biological sciences, has been awarded a fellowship through the Advanced Diagnostics & Therapeutics (AD&T) Berry Family Foundation Graduate Fellowships for his research in the lab of Malcolm J. Fraser Jr., Rev. Julius A. Nieuwland, C.S.C. Professor of Biological Sciences, developing transgenic silkworms which produce silk that could become a low-cost source of cancer therapies. 

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Dengue virus transmission dominated by those with undetected infection, study finds

Author: Brandi Klingerman

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People showing virtually no symptoms are likely the primary source of dengue fever, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens. Nearly 400 million people each year are infected with dengue virus, which is transmitted through mosquitoes. 

The study estimates that more than 80 percent of dengue virus infections are attributable to individuals with mild to no symptoms who do not seek treatment from a physician. The study also indicates that nearly a quarter of dengue virus transmission is the result of mosquitoes biting those already infected before the onset of symptoms. By the time those symptoms appear, the opportunity to prevent the virus from spreading has passed. 

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Notre Dame Research Shows Promising Results for Improving Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

Author: Brandi Klingerman

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New Notre Dame research has been used to support the Orphan Drug designation for IT-139, a compound that when used in combination with chemotherapy has proved to be significantly more effective in treating pancreatic cancer than the current standard of care. The Orphan Drug program is administered by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and identifies promising drugs that are intended for the treatment of rare diseases, which impact fewer than 200,000 Americans at any time, or affect more than 200,000 people but are not expected to recover the costs of developing and marketing a treatment drug. Currently, pancreatic cancer has one of the lowest cancer survival rates, with one-year and five-year rates of 20 and 7 percent, respectfully. 

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Funding scientific research fuels job creation

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Research Sparks Economic Growth

The University of Notre Dame is highlighted in a new report on the importance of scientific research to economic growth.

The study, which was conducted by The Science Coalition, identifies more than 100 companies that exist due to funding received by academic researchers from federal government agencies, including the Department of Agriculture, Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and National Science Foundation.

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Tuberculosis Research Sheds Light on Disease-related Protein

Author: Brandi Klingerman

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The WHO names Tuberculosis (TB) as one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide and over 95 percent of those deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. To improve the global health community’s understanding of TB and provide information that could help treat it, Notre Dame researchers have developed a new strain of the bacteria along with a new method to better study this deadly disease. 

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Improving Snow Measurement

Author: Brandi Klingerman

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Although it may seem simple to calculate, snowfall cannot be well measured by simply placing a yardstick in the ground. In actuality, snow measurement is much more complicated and oftentimes the most accurate snow measurement devices are costly. However, two Notre Dame graduate students are working to improve the snow measurement process in an effective and affordable manner.

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Identifying DNA and Developing Data

Author: Brandi Klingerman

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When it comes to battling disease and maintaining healthy environments, DNA sequencing can be imperative to success. At the University of Notre Dame, the Genomics and Bioinformatics Core Facility (GBCF) supports research in many areas that increasingly rely on DNA sequencing, including cancer biology, vector-borne diseases, the development of drug and antibiotic resistance, monitoring invasive species, and much more.

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Holding the Key to Affordable Biotherapeutics

Author: Brandi Klingerman

 

Mac Fraser

Malcolm Fraser Jr., the University of Notre Dame’s Rev. Julius A. Nieuwland, C.S.C., Professor of Biological Sciences, is conducting research that utilizes the silkworm caterpillar’s silk gland to conduct mammalian-like protein production with the end goal of producing cost-effective biotherapeutic products, or therapeutic materials created utilizing recombinant DNA technology, that can be used to treat life-threatening and chronic diseases.

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Notre Dame Research to showcase Commercialization Opportunities at BIO 2016

Author: Brandi Klingerman

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The University of Notre Dame will attend the 2016 BIO International Convention, which is hosted by the Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO) from June 6 - 9, 2016 in San Francisco. Represented Notre Dame Research groups at the event include the Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI), the Center for Nano Science and Technology (NDnano), as well as Technology Transfer.

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Understanding Behavior Key to Combating Malaria

Author: Brandi Klingerman

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Today, April 25, is the annual World Malaria Day. This year’s theme – End Malaria for Good – seeks to build upon past successes in combatting this deadly disease, which killed over 435,000 people in 2015, and sustain this progress in order to truly  “end malaria for good.” At the University of Notre Dame, Neil Lobo, a research associate professor of biological sciences and an Eck Institute for Global Health faculty member, is working to end malaria for good by focusing on the vectors that transmit the disease and how certain methods or interventions reduce malaria transmission.

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Using DNA 'fingerprinting' to understand ancestry and immunity of trees

Author: Brandi Klingerman

American chestnut nuts with burrs and leaves

When Europeans came to the New World in the 16th century, they brought measles and smallpox with them. Without the immunity Europeans had cultivated over the years, the native people in America quickly fell ill. Millions died as a result. Today, trees in the New World are also dying from diseases that were introduced through global trade started by the Europeans. However, trees are much more vulnerable than humans.

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Using mathematical models to fight the Zika virus

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Aedes aegypti mosquito

New research from the University of Notre Dame will be used to generate maps that provide time-sensitive, mosquito-to-human ratios that determine patterns of mosquito population dynamics for the Zika virus. The model outputs will be available online to provide users with the ability to find reported cases and estimated incidences by location of the virus to improve disease transmission and prevalence forecasts, which is critical to making accurate predictions and translating results into effective public health strategies.

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