News

Online biology courses engage students, mimic real life

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

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Using various online tools and unique classroom exercises, professors in the Department of Biology continue to deliver quality education to students during e-learning, caused because of the COVID-19 pandemic. And Hawk Assistant Professor Ana Lidia Flores-Mireles' class, with its focus on infectious diseases, is able to learn about the virus in different ways.

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A Decade of Progress: Continuing Notre Dame’s journey to grow as a preeminent Catholic research university

Author: Brandi Wampler

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While the University of Notre Dame has continued its commitment to inquiry and endeavor over the entirety of its history, creating the circumstances for achievement has evolved over time. Upon inauguration, Father Jenkins set out to lead a great Catholic university for the 21st century, but also one of the pre-eminent research institutions in the world.

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Strength in numbers: Crowdsourcing challenge seeks new methods to combat drug-resistant malaria

Author: Jessica Sieff

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Three hundred and sixty participants from 31 countries participated in the Malaria DREAM Challenge, a crowdsourcing effort challenging anyone in the world to develop computational models for predicting emerging drug resistance to artemisinin, a widely used therapeutic considered the “last line of defense” against multi-drug-resistant malaria.   

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Up Close with the Department Chair

Author: Matt Frazier

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Crislyn D’Souza-Schorey is Professor and Chair of the Department of Biological Sciences.  She is the first woman to serve in the role. In addition to oversight of a department of over 80 faculty and one of the largest undergraduate majors and graduate programs on campus, she also runs her cancer research laboratory.  She is married to Jeffrey Schorey, Professor of Biological Sciences; they have a son, who will be a freshman in high school in the fall. 

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Notre Dame biologist to study the role of woody vines in tropical forests

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

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Tropical forests absorb more carbon than any other system, and therefore help regulate the earth’s climate. Lianas — woody vines — that surround trees in these forests have been shown to slow rates of tree growth, but their role hasn’t been fully studied.Tarzan may find lianas in the jungle useful, but David Medvigy, associate professor in the department of biological sciences, intends to find out what they add or take away from these ecosystems.

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