News

Cilia's got the moves in the kidneys, researchers' work shows

Author: Carin Moonin

Wingert Lab

Cilia are tiny, hair-like appendages that stick out from each of your cells. They can either move to propel fluid or remain stationary, acting as antennae to receive information from their environment. Most cells have just one cilium, but some are multiciliated cells (MCCs), which means they have multiple cilia.…

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Joseph Chambers Awarded Graduate Fellowship

Author: Brandi Klingerman

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Three graduate students from Notre Dame have received fellowships from Advanced Diagnostics and Therapeutics. Each fellowship recipient will spend their summer conducting research at Notre Dame that aims to combat disease or promote health.

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Finding the sweet spot

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Senior Open Ad Flag2 Adj

Competitors arriving at the 1st hole of the U.S. Senior Open are greeted by Juday Creek. Flowing through Warren Golf Course, the stream is home to an important ecosystem, and is a valuable resource for Notre Dame researchers today.

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Can we feed 11 billion people while preventing the spread of infectious disease?

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Jason Rohr

Within the next 80 years, global food demand is expected to increase sharply to meet the needs of a projected world population topping 11 billion. The increase in agriculture will likely influence human infectious diseases, which in turn may affect food production and distribution, according to a review paper by University of Notre Dame biologist Jason Rohr and collaborators.

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China's 2014 unprecedented dengue outbreak caused by a "perfect storm" of factors, study shows

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

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A major outbreak of dengue fever in southern China in 2014 may have been caused by more than just high temperatures, numbers of mosquitoes, or imported cases from Southeast Asia. Despite previous studies that point to these specific reasons for the outbreak that affected almost 40,000 people, a new study from the University of Notre Dame shows there likely were other factors involved as well.

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Kasturi Haldar receives 2019 College Research Award

Author: Cliff Djajapranata

Haldar Profile

Congratulations to Kasturi Haldar, the Rev. Julius Nieuwland Professor of Biological Sciences and recipient of the 2019 College Research Award. Kasturi is an internationally recognized scientist who joined the Department of Biological Sciences in 2008 as the Director for what is now the Boler-Parseghian Center for Rare and Neglected Diseases. During her research career, she has made ground-breaking discoveries to advance the understanding of malaria pathogenesis and to develop novel therapies in both infectious and genetic diseases. Her work over the past several years has revealed a molecular mechanism of how Plasmodium falciparum malaria develops resistance to artemisinins, front line antimalarials for which there are still no replacement therapies.

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Microglia, cells thought restricted to central nervous system, are redefined in new study

Author: Jessica Sieff

Cody Smith Feature

Inside the body, disease and injury can leave behind quite the mess — a scattering of cellular debris, like bits of broken glass, rubber and steel left behind in a car accident. Inside the central nervous system (CNS), a region that includes the brain and spinal cord, it is the job of certain cells, called microglia, to clean up that cellular debris. Microglia have counterparts called macrophages that serve similar function outside the CNS in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), the region that contains most of the sensory and motor nerves.

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Biologist's indoor-outdoor laboratory will further research into intersection of wildlife and human health

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Jason Rohr

Finding solutions for worldwide shortages propels new University of Notre Dame biology professor Jason Rohr to find unique ways to research some of the most pressing issues. These include food shortages. Energy shortages. Even “shortages” of amphibians because of disease. Rohr, the Ludmilla F., Stephen J., and Robert T. Galla College Professor of Biological Sciences, completes research in areas that span the intersection of wildlife and human health.

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Open-source application creates super-resolution images of cell development in living animals

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Desos Image

A new tool may allow researchers to see more of the physiological state of living organisms at the cellular level, according to a study by the University of Notre Dame. Published in Development, the study shows how an open-source application, created by Notre Dame researchers, can utilize two different conventional microscope images obtained at low excitation powers to create one high-resolution, three-dimensional image. 

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